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, nevada, all of those governors will be interesting to see how many of them are very vulnerable in 2014 or not. christie, obviously, is the 2013 -- not very null vulnerable. maine, very vulnerable. this could be where some of the action is here. democratic legislatures here. here are the places where there are democratic governors and a divided legislature. arkansas, missouri and montana. arkansas is sort of the lone holdout in the south where republicans have gotten everything. but they have super majorities in places like missouri and arkansas. so they have effectively -- they can override any veto of the democratic governor, whether it's tax rates, any of those things. so they have effective control on that front. let's look at this, the other places where there is divided government in iowa, the house and senate. the governor there, republican governor. new hampshire, oh, you've seen there, not surprising. washington state, a little surprising. since it's a state with democratic dominance, if you will. and kentucky, a little surprising, since it's a state with republican dominance.
the state of nevada. ron paul did not win either state, and yet, there were a lot of delegates that were supposed to go to romney, that ended up having ron paul supporters fill that slot. shouldn't the romney folks feel as if delegates who are assigned to him, be forced to vote for him, at least on the first ballot? >> chuck, you gave a remarkably good run down on some major aspects of the rules battle, but in this respect, you didn't get it quite right. what was at issue was not whether or not candidates got the delegate votes that they would win in a primary, but whether or not a presidential candidate could disallow and remove delegates that they didn't like. there was a big uproar over this. and there was no question, ever, that delegate votes won in a primary wouldn't be cast as allocated by state law. >> let me stop you here. you, specifically say "primary." you believe it's different for caucus states? >> well, in a caucus situation, the people are actually elected as delegates, in some way, under state party rules. so it really wasn't an issue with respect to caucus states, becau
of the latino vote in american politics than nevada. 2010, harry reid won 69% of latinos in his race against sharron angle. two years later, obama won that vote matching what he received nationwide. they make up 27% of the state's population overall, 19% of the actual voting electorate. critics also charge the president though is making a political point by flying nine hours to make this immigration speech. five there, four on the way back. but in some ways he's returning to del sol high school where he was met with huge crowds during his 2008 campaign, a day after the group of senators unveiled their new plan for dealing with roughly 11 million undocumented people living in this country. this trip, by the way, is all about the white house saying hey, we made a campaign promise. and we're going to go to places that they made this campaign promise to show we're trying to fulfill it. >> we have been too content for too long to allow individuals to mow our lawn, serve our food, clean our homes, and even watch our children while not affording them any of the benefits that make our country so gre
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5 (some duplicates have been removed)

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